May 18, 2016

Long Awaited New Overtime Rules Issued

Posted in Administrative Exemption, Computer-related Occupations Exemption, Executive Exemption, Exempt/Non-Exempt Employees, Fair Labor Standards Act, Outside Sales Exemption, Overtime, Professional Exemption, Uncategorized tagged , , , , , , , at 1:15 pm by Tom Jacobson

time clockThe much-anticipated new overtime rules have been issued by the United States Department of Labor. The new rules will go into effect December 1, 2016 so employers will have until then to prepare.

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has published an excellent summary of the new rules, and I encourage you to review that. Then, contact me to discuss how to implement the new rules in your workplace.

Also, the new rules will be discussed at the 13th Annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update. There are still a few seats available at the seminar — click here for registration information.

For more information about these or other employment law issues, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this article are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2016 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz Cass, PA.

May 5, 2016

Tick Tock: Appeals Court Opens Door to Stale Discrimination Claims by Broadly Interpreting Statute of Limitations Tolling Clause

Posted in Age, Discrimination, Employee Handbooks, Harassment, Limitation of Actions, MDHR Mediation, Sexual Harassment, Statutes of Limitation tagged , , , , , , , at 11:42 am by Tom Jacobson

Tom Jacobson retake - Copy - Cropped

“In light of the Peterson decision, employers should review their HR complaint policies to minimize the chance of inadvertent extensions of the Minnesota Human Rights Act statute of limitations,” says employment law attorney Tom Jacobson.

Employers may need to update their HR complaint policies and procedures in light of a May 2, 2016 decision by the Minnesota Court of Appeals in the case of Peterson v. City of Minneapolis. The decision has the impact of potentially extending the time limit employees have for pursuing claims under the Minnesota Human Rights Act, and policy updates may minimize the impact of this decision.

The Peterson case started when two Minneapolis police officers claimed their October, 2011 transfers were the result of age discrimination. The officers filed complaints with the city’s human resources department a month later. The HR department investigated the complaints, and in January, 2013 the department concluded that the transfers were not based on age.

The officers then filed age discrimination charges with the Minnesota Department of Human Rights. They later withdrew those charges, but in March, 2014 they filed a lawsuit against the city of Minneapolis. The trial court dismissed the officers’ case on the basis that it was started after the one year statute of limitations in the Minnesota Human Rights Act had expired. One of the officers appealed.

In reviewing the trial court’s decision, the appellate court noted that under the MHRA:

The running of the one-year limitation period is suspended during the time a potential charging party and respondent are voluntarily engaged in a dispute resolution process involving a claim of unlawful discrimination under this chapter, including arbitration, conciliation, mediation or grievance procedures pursuant to a collective bargaining agreement or statutory, charter, ordinance provisions for a civil service or other employment system or a school board sexual harassment or sexual violence policy.

Thus, the issue before the Court of Appeals was whether filing an internal complaint with the city’s HR department meant the parties were “voluntarily engaged in a dispute resolution process involving a claim of unlawful discrimination,” so as to suspend (or “toll”) the running of the MHRA’s one-year statute of limitations. The court ruled that they were.

Specifically, the court held that the city’s HR complaint process was a “dispute resolution process” under the MHRA, so by engaging in that process, the statute of limitations did not run while that process was ongoing. Consequently, the officers’ MDHR charge, which was filed more than a year after the alleged discrimination, was ruled to be timely despite the MHRA’s one-year statute of limitations.

With this ruling, the Court of Appeals has essentially given employees a tool for dragging out their deadline for filing MHRA charges or lawsuits well beyond the one-year time limit they would otherwise have. This is because for as long as they and the employer are engaged in an internal HR complaint process, the statute of limitations clock will likely not be ticking.

Taken to extremes, this means an employee could file an internal complaint 364 days after an alleged discriminatory act, thereby likely suspending the statute of limitations that would otherwise have expired the next day. And, because the Court of Appeals did not clarify the limits of what it means to “voluntarily engage in” such internal complaint processes, it appears an employee could extend the time limit almost indefinitely by repeatedly engaging the employer in ongoing discussions about the same problem or the process itself.

It is difficult to predict how this case will play out in practice. However, to minimize its impact, employers should consider: revising HR complaint policies to address how such complaints impact the MHRA’s statute of limitations; promptly investigating and resolving discrimination and harassment complaints so as to quickly end what could be perceived as “voluntary engagement” in a “dispute resolution process.”

For more information about these or other employment law issues, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this article are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2016 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz Cass, PA.

April 22, 2016

Registration Open for 13th Annual Employment Law Update

Posted in Discrimination, Fair Labor Standards Act, Reasonable Accommodation tagged , , , , at 11:13 am by Tom Jacobson

Swenson Lervick Law FirmPlease join us for the 13th Annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update at the Alexandria Technical and Community College on Thursday, June 2, 2016!

This year’s topics include:

  • Hot off the Press — Employment Law News You Can Use
  • The Changing Nature of Accommodation
  • New FLSA Developments and Salary Rules
  • Legal Considerations for Transgender Employees

This annual Employment Law Update will again focus on the significant changes and updates to employment law issues and provide current information and resources in a variety of important areas. In addition, the event will include an informative panel discussion with employement law attorneys who will answer your questions about the featured sessions and other timely topics on employment law. SHRM CP, SCP, and HRCI credits are approved for the sessions, with certificate information available for attendees.

Presenting attorneys will be Tom Jacobson, Mike Moberg, Sara McGrane and Penelope Phillips.

PLUS…this year’s attendees will also enjoy this Bonus HR Session:

Cultivate Courage” presented by Dave Cornell. Dave is a keynote speaker, trainer, and personal development and leadership coach, provides a variety of services to individuals and organizations, all designed to help people be better than they think they can be and do things they think might not be possible: see opportunities instead of roadblocks, embrace change and create a vision for new possibilities, and transform and energize from the inside out.

Please see the full seminar Agenda and Registration information on the attached flyers.

Seating is limited. Registrations are due by May 23, 2016.

We hope to see you there!

June 16, 2015

Medical Marijuana: Are You Ready to Roll with It?

Posted in Application Process, Discrimination, Drug and Alcohol Testing, Drug and Alcohol Testing, Medical Marijuana, Medical Marijuana, Minnesota Drug and Alcohol Testing in the Workplace Act tagged , , , , , , , at 9:53 am by Tom Jacobson

medical marijuana and the workplace

Medical cannabis can be lawfully dispensed in Minnesota starting July 1, 2015. How will it impact your workplace?

Medical marijuana (technically, “medical cannabis”) can be lawfully dispensed in Minnesota starting July 1, 2015. What does this mean for Minnesota employers?

First, the state’s new medical cannabis law generally prohibits Minnesota employers from using a job applicant’s or employee’s status of being on the medical cannabis registry as a reason for discriminating against that person. In other words, Minnesota employers generally cannot discipline, discharge or refuse to hire someone just because they are on the registry.

The new law also largely prohibits employers from discriminating against employees and applicants who test positive for cannabis unless they used, possessed or were impaired by the drug while at the work site or during work. While proving use or possession should not be too problematic, the law certainly complicates the “impaired by” part of the analysis.

Historically, employers could prove impairment by administering a drug test that complies with the Minnesota Drug and Alcohol Testing in the Workplace Act (“MDATWA”). A positive test under MDATWA opened the door for future disciplinary action or withdrawing a job offer. Now, not only are employers prohibited from discriminating against employees and applicants who test positive, but also employees and applicants will have the right to provide their medical cannabis registration as an explanation for a positive test. While this still does not allow a registered patient to use, possess or be impaired by the drug at work, the challenge is that a positive test for cannabis will not necessarily prove when the employee or applicant used, possessed or was impaired by the drug.

As noted above, these are the general rules. There are a few key exceptions. Specifically, employers may discriminate against those on the state’s medical marijuana registry if failing to do so would violate federal law or regulations or cause the employer to lose a monetary or licensing-related benefit under federal law or regulations. Thus, employers who are covered by laws such as the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 or the Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act of 1991 will be able to hold registered patients to a higher standard.

Employers also need to recognize that Minnesota’s medical marijuana law differs significantly from comparable laws in other states. Therefore, they should not pay too much attention to what happens elsewhere. For example, in one recent case (Coats v. Dish Network, LLC) the Colorado Supreme Court ruled that Dish Network lawfully fired an employee who tested positive for marijuana, even though that employee was apparently using the drug lawfully under that state’s marijuana laws. Given Minnesota’s prohibition against discriminating against registered patients who test positive, the outcome would probably be different here.

As a practical matter, dealing with the implications of the state’s medical cannabis law should be a relatively rare occurrence. The state estimates there are only 5,000 people (about 0.09% of the entire state) who will qualify to be on the registry (see J. Ehrlich, Minnesota Medical Marijuana: What You Need to Know, MPR News, June 1, 2015). With a labor force of about three million workers (see Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development Unemployment Statistics for April, 2015), that means there are probably only 2,700 potential workers statewide who could be on the registry. Given the severity of the conditions for which a person may qualify to be on the registry, the likelihood of those people also being in the workforce is even more remote.

Nevertheless, employers must be prepared to address the workplace challenges presented by Minnesota’s medical cannabis law. Specifically, workplace drug and alcohol policies (particularly MDATWA-compliant testing policies) should be reviewed and revised if needed to take into account the state’s medical cannabis law. And, employers will need to rely on evidence other than a drug test if they want to take action against employees or applicants who they believe have used, possessed or were impaired by marijuana on the work site or during work hours.

For more information, see please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this article are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2015 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz Cass, PA

May 12, 2014

Seminar to address Women’s Economic Security Act

Posted in Care of Relatives Leave, Discrimination, Domestic violence, Equal Pay, Family and Medical Leave Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Family Leave, Gender / Sex, Leaves of Absence, Leaves of Absence, Minnesota Parenting Leave Act, Nursing Mothers, Parenting Leave, Pregnancy, Reasonable Accommodation, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave tagged , , , at 8:40 am by Tom Jacobson

Gov. Mark Dayton yesterday signed into law the Women’s Economic Security Act. Among other things, the new law will expand leave rights for many Minnesota employees. The new law will be covered in detail at the Eleventh Annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update to be held on Thursday, June 12, 2014 at Alexandria Technical and Community College.

The event has been approved for 6.0 HRCI credits. For complete details on the seminar, go to 2014 Employment Law Update Agenda. To register, go to 2014 Employment Law Update Registration.

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

May 9, 2014

Legislative update: MHRA jury trials and Women’s Economic Security Act advance

Posted in Care of Relatives Leave, Court Trial, Discrimination, Domestic violence, Family and Medical Leave Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Family Leave, Jury Trial, Leaves of Absence, Nursing Mothers, Parenting Leave, Remedies, Sick Leave, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave tagged , , , , , , , , , , at 9:26 am by Tom Jacobson

Both houses of the Minnesota Legislature on May 8, 2014 took action to advance legislation which, if signed into law by Gov. Mark Dayton, will have significant impacts on Minnesota employers and employees.

First, with a 43-24 vote the Senate approved the Women’s Economic Security Act (HF2536) which, among other things, would expand parenting and sick leave rights. For more information on this bill, see Women’s Economic Security Act Passed by MN House.

Then, with a 79-51 vote the House approved the Senate’s amendment to the Minnesota Human Rights Act (MHRA) (SF 2322). This amendment would add the right to a jury trial as a remedy under the MHRA. For more information on this bill, see Minnesota Senate Adds Jury Trial Right to Minnesota Human Rights Act.

For more information about this legislation, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

May 6, 2014

MN Senate adds jury trial right to Human Rights Act

Posted in Court Trial, Discrimination, Jury Trial, Remedies tagged , , , , , , at 9:14 am by Tom Jacobson

SF 2322By changing a single sentence in the Minnesota Human Rights Act (MHRA), the Minnesota Senate on May 1, 2014 passed a bill which, if it becomes law, will significantly change the way MHRA disputes are decided in the courtroom.

Currently, the law (Minn. Stat. § 362A.33, subd. 6) provides that, “Any action brought pursuant to this chapter shall be heard and determined by a judge sitting without a jury.” However, the Senate’s version (SF 2322), which passed on a 55-0 vote, would change that sentence to read, “A person bringing a civil action seeking redress for an unfair discriminatory practice or a respondent is entitled to a jury trial.”

The change would be significant, for it would drastically change the way MDHR cases — such as claims for employment discrimination — would be litigated. Generally speaking, jury trials are far more expensive and complicated than are cases tried to a judge alone. A jury of six people can also be far more difficult to predict than a single judge. The change would, however, make state law consistent with its federal counterpart (Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964), which already allows for jury trials.

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

April 30, 2014

Registration Open for 11th Annual Employment Law Update

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Application Process, Arrest records, Background Checking, Conviction Records, Credit Checks, Criminal History, Discrimination, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Interactive Process, Minnesota Human Rights Act, Reasonable Accommodation, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Stereotyping, Training tagged , , , , , , , at 11:38 am by Tom Jacobson

Registration is now open for the Eleventh Annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update to be held on Thursday, June 12, 2014 at Alexandria Technical and Community College. This year’s event will cover:

  • Hot off the Press — Employment Law News You Can Use: presented by yours truly
  • Reasonable Accommodation and Fitness for Duty: A Practical Guidance on Real Work Problems: presented by attorney Penelope J. Phillips
  • Emerging Discrimination Issues in Employment Law: presented by attorney Mike Moberg
  • Ban the Box and Criminal Background Checks: Putting it All Together So That You Get it Right: presented by attorney Penelope J. Phillips
  • Bonus HR Session: Recruit, Motivate and Retain Your Workforce: presented by humorist and corporate trainer, Ted Schick

The event has been approved for 6.0 HRCI credits. Go to 2014 Employment Law Update Agenda for complete details and to 2014 Employment Law Update Registration to register. I look forward to seeing you on June 12!

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

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