September 24, 2012

Royal Photos Shine Light on Privacy Concerns

Posted in Background Checking, Computer Use, Cyber Bullying, Employee Privacy, Internet Policies, Intrusion upon Seclusion, Invasion of Privacy, Misappropriation of Likeness, Publication of Private Facts, Social Networking, Telework / Telecommuting, Uncategorized tagged , , , , , , , at 10:30 am by Tom Jacobson

As far as I know, no paparazzi has ever caught me in a compromising photo. Well, there is one of me shaving my legs before qualifying for Nationals at the 1985 North Central Conference swimming championships.  It surfaced on Facebook 25 years later (thanks to one of my fun-loving teammates!), but my Gillette moment has obviously never drawn the kind of attention that two royals frolicking on a balcony in France get.

Me, prepping for NCC Swimming Championships (spring, 1985).

The whole Kate and William thing shines new light on an old problem: the blurred line between a person’s public life and private life. So, just what are a person’s rights when that line is crossed?

Minnesota recognizes three distinct claims for invasion of privacy: intrusion upon seclusion, misappropriation of another’s likeness, and publication of private facts.  The Minnesota Supreme Court recognized these three separate claims in the 1998 case of Lake v. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. In that case, the Court differentiated between the three claims as follows:

Intrusion upon seclusion occurs when one intentionally intrudes, physically or otherwise, upon the solitude or seclusion of another or his private affairs or concerns if the intrusion would be highly offensive to a reasonable person.

Misappropriation protects an individual’s identity and is committed when one appropriates to his own use or benefit the name or likeness of another.

Publication of private facts is an invasion of privacy when one gives publicity to a matter concerning the private life of another if the matter publicized is of a kind that (a) would be highly offensive to a reasonable person, and (b) is not of legitimate concern to the public.

For the most part, the issue is the same as it has always been: people have a right to live their private lives, to not have others misappropriate their identities, and to not have private aspects of their lives made public. But what has changed is the ease with which these rights can be violated. Sophisticated, yet accessible, technology makes it easy to gather information about others. And, with a few clicks of a mouse, that information can be shared with the world.

The workplace presents special privacy challenges. Employers have a need to know about the people they hire and employ, so they want to gather information about those employees. Employers also need to make sure their computers, websites, e-mail and other technologies are being used appropriately, so they may want to monitor their employees’ use of these technologies. And, once sensitive information is learned, employers are challenged to make sure it is not used or shared inappropriately.

What you need to know: To minimize the risk of being held liable for invasion of privacy, employers need to develop policies and procedures that strike a balance between their need to gather and use relevant information about employees and their employees’ privacy rights.  This is particularly true with respect to technology and social media policies.

For more information about this article, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2012 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

Advertisements

June 30, 2011

Parades, puppies and the “Fargo” woodchipper

Posted in Attendance, Breaks, Computer Use, Confidential Information, Contracts, Employee Privacy, Fair Labor Standards Act, Hours Worked, Leaves of Absence, Leaves of Absence, Overtime, Record Keeping, Social Media in the Workplace, Telework / Telecommuting, Vacation Policies tagged , , at 8:51 am by Tom Jacobson

Last week I took a staycation.  Despite the fact that it was one of the rainiest June weeks on record for our neck of the woods, we had a great time. We watched two parades and a swim meet, spent time with our son who is home on leave from the Air Force Academy, and we played with our litter of Labrador pups .  We even took a side-trip to Fargo to see the wood chipper from the movie, Fargo.  And, except for my first day off when I needed to put out a fire that started the day before, I managed to not check my work e-mail or voice mail for a week.

But what if I had checked my e-mail or voice mail?  What if I had texted my secretary or my clients?  What if I had decided to post this commentary from home during one of those downpours?  Telecommuting, or “telework,” would have allowed me to turn my staycation into a working vacation.

Telecommuting offers tremendous benefits.  It allows for flexible work arrangements.  It can save on fuel and other transportation costs.  It can keep employees productive when circumstances would otherwise prevent them from working.

But telecommuting can also be a trap for the unwary.  Aside from the fact that it can distract us from our R&R, working remotely raises a number of employer-employee issues, such as:

* How are working hours tracked for an employee who works remotely?

* Is the telecommuting employee getting the break time to which s/he may be legally entitled?

* Is the employee entitled to overtime when the hours worked remotely are added to his/her workweek?

* Is an employee really on “leave” if s/he is working remotely while supposedly taking time off?

* Is the employee entitled to any tax deductions for a “home office”?

* To what extent is an employee entitled to worker’s compensation benefits if s/he is injured while working from home, and does this give the employer the right to inspect the employee’s home for safety concerns?

* How secure is the employer’s data if an employee is accessing it from or storing it on his/her home computer?

* What privacy rights, if any, does an employee have with respect to his/her cell phone, computer, etc. that is used to work remotely?

* Which jobs work best for telecommuting arrangements?

* What is lost (or in come cases, gained) when telecommuting co-workers do not have face-to-face contact?

* How can the employer be assured that the teleworking employee is actually working?

To avoid falling into a telecommuting trap, employers need to understand the risks, as well as the rewards, of remote working arrangements.  Then, by developing telecommuting agreements and policies,  employers can take full advantage of the benefits that telecommuting can offer.  For more information about the development and use of such policies and agreements, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2011 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson, PA

June 14, 2011

Child pornography on workplace computers — ND employees become mandatory reporters

Posted in Computer Use, Cyber Bullying, Employee Handbooks, Employee Privacy, First Amendment, Social Media in the Workplace, Social Networking, Telework / Telecommuting tagged , , , , , , at 7:59 am by Tom Jacobson

In an effort to stem the troubling tide of child pornography, North Dakota has taken a unique approach: the state has passed a law requiring that all workers who know or suspect that child pornography is on a workplace computer must report the information to the North Dakota Department of Human Services.

The new law, which goes into effect on August 1, 2011 adds the following provision to section 50-25.1-03 of the state’s Child Abuse and Neglect Law:  “A person who has knowledge of or reasonable cause to suspect that a child is abused or neglected, based on images of sexual conduct by a child discovered on a workplace computer, shall report the circumstances to the department.” Under this law, it will be a crime for an employee/mandatory reporter to willfully fail to make the required report.  It will also be a crime for an employer to retaliate against an employee who makes a good faith report.

Minnesota also has a mandatory reporting law, Minnesota Statute § 626.556, but it does not impose a reporting obligation on workers in general; only certain professionals such as doctors, social workers, law enforcement personnel, clergy, etc., are designated as mandatory reporters of child abuse or neglect.  And, it does not directly address this issue of computerized child pornography.

North Dakota’s new law is not only an aggressive move to try to stop child pornography, for it is also a regulatory foray into the intertwining world of work, technology, social media, and privacy rights.   Arguably, this law gives North Dakota employers a stronger case that their employees should not expect any right of privacy with respect to their use of company computers.  It should also be signal to everyone that new laws will likely be passed to address the complex entanglement of work, social media and related technologies.

Until these laws are on the books, or until existing laws are interpreted and applied to these ever-changing technologies, the best practice is to develop sound employment policies that clarify what every employee’s rights and responsibilities are with respect to their use of social media, computers, smart phones and whatever the next great technologies may be.

For more information about this article, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2011 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson, PA

December 29, 2010

When the weather is frightful and work’s not delightful: the case for telework

Posted in Employee Handbooks, Telework / Telecommuting tagged , , , at 11:17 am by Tom Jacobson

When the weather outside is frightful and the fire is so delightful, employers are rarely heard singing “Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow.”  Instead, their human resources directors comb through company policies to figure out how to handle the workers who are stuck at home until the plows can clear the way back to the office.  At the same time, business owners are calculating the revenue lost because of stranded workers who cannot do their jobs.

Blizzards and other severe weather events are not the only situations that prevent workers from being physically present on the job.  Other emergencies, injuries, illnesses and family commitments can have the same impact.  To weather such storms, employers may want to consider telework arrangements.

Granted, telework is  not feasible when a person must be physically present at the job-site.  However, with advances in technology, the decreasing cost of that technology, and the increasing number of jobs that are heavily reliant on the processing of information, telework (or “telecommuting”) is a viable option in many workplaces.

Moreover, it is likely that telework options will in the not to distant future be required in more places of employment.  The federal government is already moving in that direction, for on December 9, 2010 President Barack Obama signed into law the federal Telework Enhancement Act (“TEA”).  Among other mandates, this law requires federal agencies to identify workers who are eligible for telework,  appoint telework managing officers, develop training programs and enter into written agreements with employees who work remotely.

TEA was introduced in early 2009, but it was stranded for months until the Washington, D.C. blizzards of 2009-10 forced the federal government to shut down, costing it tens of millions of dollars per day in lost productivity (B. Leonard, President Signs Federal Employment Telework Legislation, SHRM Dec. 10, 2010).  After that, the law cruised through Congress when it was seen as a means to limit lost productivity.  As large metropolitan areas once again dig out from the massive snowstorms of late 2010, it would not be surprising to see similar legislation passed at the state and local levels.

Even if it’s not because of the weather or mandated by law, telework is an increasingly viable option to increase productivity, so employers should consider adopting policies that allow it.  Such policies must, however, be carefully drafted to account for the myriad of laws that will still apply whether an employee is working at the office or at home  — in his PJ’s  — where the fire is so delightful.

If you have any questions about this post, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

%d bloggers like this: