May 26, 2015

Registration Deadline is June 1 for Employment Law Update

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Application Process, Arrest records, Background Checking, Ban the Box, Conviction Records, Credit Checks, Criminal History, Disability, Discrimination, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Family and Medical Leave Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Form I-9, Interactive Process, Leaves of Absence, Minnesota Human Rights Act, Minnesota Parenting Leave Act, Parenting Leave, Pregnancy Leave, Reasonable Accommodation, Recruiting, Safety Leave, Sick Leave, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Training, Unexcused Absence, Voting Rights, Women's Economic Security Act tagged , , , , , at 4:20 pm by Tom Jacobson

attorney Tom Jacobson alexandria mn

Tom Jacobson

The registration deadline for the Twelfth Annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update is June 1. Seating for the June 11, 2015 event is limited, so please register soon if you plan to attend.

For more details and registration forms, please see Registration Open for Twelfth Annual West Central MN Employment Law Update, or contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com or 320-763-3141.

I hope to see you on June 11!

Copyright 2015 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

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April 17, 2015

Registration Open for Twelfth Annual West Central MN Employment Law Update

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Application Process, Arrest records, Background Checking, Ban the Box, Conviction Records, Credit Checks, Criminal History, Disability, Discrimination, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Family and Medical Leave Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Form I-9, Interactive Process, Leaves of Absence, Minnesota Human Rights Act, Minnesota Parenting Leave Act, Parenting Leave, Pregnancy Leave, Reasonable Accommodation, Recruiting, Safety Leave, Sick Leave, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Training, Unexcused Absence, Voting Rights, Women's Economic Security Act tagged , , , , , at 9:19 am by Tom Jacobson

attorney Tom Jacobson alexandria mn

Tom Jacobson

Registration is now open for the Twelfth Annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update to be held Thursday, June 11, 2015. The event is sponsored by West Central Minnesota SHRM, and it will be held at Alexandria Technical and Community College.

The morning session is designed to inform employers about developing areas of employment law, and it will be presented by four attorneys who practice extensively in that area of the law: Tom Jacobson, Mike Moberg, Sara McGrane and Penelope Phillips. Topics for this year’s event will include:

  • An update on significant employment law developments since last year’s event
  • How to apply the myriad of leave / time off entitlements required by Minnesota law
  • What to do when the ADA, FMLA and worker’s compensation collide due to an employee’s medical condition
  • Legal traps in recruiting

The afternoon session will feature award-winning speaker Andy Masters. Masters is an award-winning author and international speaker who provides attendees with not only a memorable multi-media experience, but also immediate “take-home” value for all levels of HR leadership to help them develop and empower a workforce of future leaders.

Click on the following links for more information and the registration form:

Comments from prior years:

  • “Great event!”
  • “Excellent – would highly recommend!”
  • “I go to several conferences/seminars every year & this is the most informative of all.  Plus, the group is open & friendly — very nice! Thank you!”
  • “Overall — great day & worth the time!”
  • “Excellent program for the price.”

Contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com or 320-763-3141 if you need more information. We hope you can join us on June 11!

Copyright 2015 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

March 20, 2015

Save the Date for Twelfth Annual West Central MN Employment Law Update

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Application Process, Arrest records, Background Checking, Ban the Box, Conviction Records, Credit Checks, Criminal History, Disability, Discrimination, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Family and Medical Leave Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Form I-9, Interactive Process, Leaves of Absence, Minnesota Human Rights Act, Minnesota Parenting Leave Act, Parenting Leave, Pregnancy Leave, Reasonable Accommodation, Recruiting, Safety Leave, Sick Leave, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Training, Unexcused Absence, Voting Rights, Women's Economic Security Act tagged , , , , at 9:04 am by Tom Jacobson

The twelfth annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update will be held Thursday, June 11, 2015 at Alexandria Technical and Community College. The morning session is designed to inform employers about developing areas of employment law, and it will be presented by four attorneys who practice extensively in that area of the law: Tom Jacobson, Mike Moberg, Sara McGrane and Penelope Phillips. Topics for this year’s event will include:

  • An update on significant employment law developments since last year’s event
  • How to apply the myriad of leave / time off entitlements required by Minnesota law
  • What to do when the ADA, FMLA and worker’s compensation collide due to an employee’s medical condition
  • Legal traps in recruiting

The afternoon session will feature award-winning speaker Andy Masters.

Comments from prior years:

  • “Great event!”
  • “Excellent – would highly recommend!”
  • “I go to several conferences/seminars every year & this is the most informative of all.  Plus, the group is open & friendly — very nice! Thank you!”
  • “Overall — great day & worth the time!”
  • “Excellent program for the price.”

We hope you can join us on June 11! Stay tuned for registration, agenda and other details.

Save the Date

Copyright 2015 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

August 1, 2014

Another day, another Executive Order impacting federal contractors

Posted in Age, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Americans with Disabilities Act, Arbitration, Arbitration, Color, Creed, Disability, Discrimination, Fair Labor Standards Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Gender / Sex, Harassment, LGBT, Minnesota Human Rights Act, National Labor Relations Act, National Origin, Pregnancy, Race, Religion, Sexual Harassment tagged , , , at 11:23 am by Tom Jacobson

White HouseIn another attempt to flex his regulatory muscle, President Barack Obama on July 31, 2014 issued yet another Executive Order aimed at federal contractors. This one, the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order, requires potential federal contractors to disclose past employment and labor law violations before they can secure federal contracts.

Earlier this month, President Obama issued an Executive Order to protect the rights of LGBT employees of federal contractors (see President Issues Order to Protect LGBT Workers).

Yesterday’s Order requires most potential federal contractors to disclose violations in the past three years of thirteen specified federal labor and employment laws. These laws include the National Labor Relations Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and any state counterparts of these statutes.

The Order also directs employers with contracts of $1 million or more to “agree that the decision to arbitrate claims arising under title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 or any tort related to or arising out of sexual assault or harassment may only be made with the voluntary consent of employees or independent contractors after such disputes arise.” In other words, the Order will severely limit these federal contractors’ rights to enter into pre-dispute arbitration agreements.

The Order appears to be directed at preventing repeat offenders, but it will have a major impact on employers who will need to overcome this new regulatory hurdle before securing federal contracts.

For more information about the President’s Order, see Obama Signs Executive Order Protecting Federal Contractors’ Employees (CBS News, 7/31/14), President Issues Order Requiring Contractors to Disclose Labor Law Violations When Competing for Federal Contracts (SHRM, 7/31/14), the President’s FACT SHEET: Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order, or contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

April 30, 2014

Registration Open for 11th Annual Employment Law Update

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Application Process, Arrest records, Background Checking, Conviction Records, Credit Checks, Criminal History, Discrimination, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Interactive Process, Minnesota Human Rights Act, Reasonable Accommodation, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Stereotyping, Training tagged , , , , , , , at 11:38 am by Tom Jacobson

Registration is now open for the Eleventh Annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update to be held on Thursday, June 12, 2014 at Alexandria Technical and Community College. This year’s event will cover:

  • Hot off the Press — Employment Law News You Can Use: presented by yours truly
  • Reasonable Accommodation and Fitness for Duty: A Practical Guidance on Real Work Problems: presented by attorney Penelope J. Phillips
  • Emerging Discrimination Issues in Employment Law: presented by attorney Mike Moberg
  • Ban the Box and Criminal Background Checks: Putting it All Together So That You Get it Right: presented by attorney Penelope J. Phillips
  • Bonus HR Session: Recruit, Motivate and Retain Your Workforce: presented by humorist and corporate trainer, Ted Schick

The event has been approved for 6.0 HRCI credits. Go to 2014 Employment Law Update Agenda for complete details and to 2014 Employment Law Update Registration to register. I look forward to seeing you on June 12!

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

March 26, 2014

Save the date!

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Application Process, Arrest records, Background Checking, Conviction Records, Criminal History, Disability, Discrimination, Family and Medical Leave Act, Interactive Process, Leaves of Absence, Reasonable Accommodation, Sexual Orientation, Sick Leave, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave, Training, Unexcused Absence tagged , , , at 5:18 pm by Tom Jacobson

The eleventh annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update will be held Thursday, June 12, 2014 at Alexandria Technical and Community College. The morning session of the event is designed to inform employers about developing areas of employment law, and it will be presented by four attorneys who practice extensively in that area of the law: Tom Jacobson, Mike Moberg and Penelope Phillips.

The afternoon session will feature Ted Schick, who will educate and entertain with his presentation, “Recruit, Motivate and Retain Your Workforce.”

Comments from last year’s event:

  • “I attend yearly and look forward to it! Thanks!”
  • “I go to several conferences/seminars every year & this is the most informative of all.  Plus, the group is open & friendly — very nice! Thank you!”
  • “Overall — great day & worth the time!”
  • “Excellent program for the price.”

We hope you can join us on June 12! Stay tuned for registration, agenda and other details.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

July 31, 2013

Things are not always as they seem

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Disability, Discrimination, Fair Labor Standards Act, Minimum Wage, Overtime, Reasonable Accommodation tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 4:50 pm by Tom Jacobson

IMG_5116 Edited“Why is Sam sticking his fingers in Spencer’s mouth?” That’s what ran through my head a couple of years ago when I snapped this picture of one of my sons and a teammate working at a swim meet. When you look closely, you’ll see that things are not always as they seem.

Things are not always as they may seem in the legal world, either. A while back I wrote about an employee who was found eligible for unemployment benefits despite her failure to report to work for two months. For more on that story, click here.

There’s also the more recent case of Lucas v. Jerusalem Cafe, LLC. where a number of workers who were unauthorized aliens sued their employer for overtime and minimum wage violations under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Because they were unauthorized aliens, our first reaction might be to question why they would have a right to sue for a FLSA violation or even collect wages in the first place. That’s what the employer argued, but the court disagreed, noting that “The FLSA does not allow employers to exploit any employee’s immigration status or to profit from hiring unauthorized aliens in violation of federal law.” Interestingly, the court also noted how the employer’s argument rested “on a legal theory as flawed today as it was in 1931 when jurors convicted Al Capone of failing to pay taxes on illicit income.”

But what if an employee sleeps on the job?  Shouldn’t he be fired? Not if waking him would be a reasonable accommodation for a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act, according to the federal judge in Virginia who is presiding over the case of Riddle v. Hubbell Lighting, Inc.

Unemployment statutes, the ADA and the FLSA are just a few of the many employment laws where outcomes are not always what you might expect them to be. For a better idea of what those outcomes might be, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2013 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

May 15, 2013

EEOC’s first GINA suit settled for $50,000

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Disability, Discrimination, Genetic Information, Genetic Information Non-discriminaton Act (GINA), Regarded as Disabled tagged , , , , , , at 10:14 am by Tom Jacobson

I’m a fan of the The Big Bang Theory — the TV show, that is.

Jim Parsons, as Dr. Sheldon Cooper in "The Big Bang Theory"

Jim Parsons, as Dr. Sheldon Cooper in “The Big Bang Theory”

For the uninitiated, it’s a CBS sitcom revolving around the lives of four Caltech scientists, including the narcissistic theoretical physicist, Dr. Sheldon Cooper, who once proclaimed his genetic superiority by divulging that he has, “a sister with the same basic DNA mix who hostesses at Fuddruckers.”

The Big Bang cast can joke all they want about their family history. However, Tulsa, OK-based Fabricut, Inc. has learned that misusing such information at work can be costly, for it has agreed to pay $50,000.00 to settle the EEOC’s first lawsuit under the Genetic Information Nondisclosure Act (GINA).

According to the EEOC’s suit, Fabricut offered Rhonda Jones a job and then sent her to a contract examiner for a pre-employment drug test and physical. As part of the exam, Jones was subjected to medical testing and required to disclose disorders in her family medical history. The examiner concluded that more testing was needed to determine whether she suffered from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Fabricut then asked Jones to be evaluated for CTS by her personal physician. She complied, and her doctor concluded that she did not have CTS. Nevertheless, the company rescinded its job offer because its contract examiner indicated that she did have CTS.

The EEOC alleged this violated GINA. Enacted in 2009, GINA is a federal law that makes it unlawful for covered employers to discriminate against employees on the basis of their genetic information, including family history. It also restricts employers from requesting, requiring or purchasing such information. The EEOC also alleged that Fabricut violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

In the consent decree settling the case, Fabricut agreed to pay $50,000.00, plus

  • Post an anti-discrimination notice to employees
  • Disseminate anti-discrimination policies to employees
  • Provide anti-discrimination training to employees with hiring responsibilities.

What you need to know: The EEOC has now identified genetic discrimination as one of it enforcement priorities. According to EEOC Regional Attorney Barbara Seely, “Although GINA has been law since 2009, many employers still do not understand that requesting family medical history, even through a contract medical examiner, violates this law.” Thus, employers and employees need to understand their rights and responsibilities under GINA.

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2013 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

January 4, 2013

Swine flu as ADA disability? Maybe when pigs fly …

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Disability, Discrimination, Regarded as Disabled tagged , , , , , , , , at 4:58 pm by Tom Jacobson

Dec. 26, 2012 -- Under the London Bridge, Lake Havasu, AZ

Dec. 26, 2012 — Under the London Bridge, Lake Havasu, AZ

Over Christmas I joined my wife’s family for an escape to Lake Havasu, AZ. We enjoyed the warm sun, visited the re-constructed London Bridge, lounged by the pool, and even though many of the 17 of us shared a cold, we had a fantastic time. And when it was time to get back to the office, no one fired me over a fear that I might infect everyone with some contagious disease I may have picked up while out-of-state.

Francisco Valdez was not so lucky.  According to court documents, Valdez worked for Minnesota Quarries, Inc. d/b/a Mankato Kasota Stone, Inc. In the spring of 2009 Valdez traveled to his native Mexico to visit his gravely ill sister who died while he was en route. At the time, the Centers for Disease control had advised against non-essential travel to Mexico due to a swine flu outbreak there. When Valdez tried to return to work a week later, the company’s HR director told him that he was being terminated because the company feared he might have contracted swine flu and because he had violated the company’s no-call/no-show policy.

Valdez sued Kasota Stone, alleging among other things that being fired because of a fear that he had swine flu violated the Americans with Disabilities Act. Specifically, Valdez claimed that because Kasota Stone was afraid he had swine flu, the company regarded him as disabled. Under the ADA, the term “disability” includes being “regarded as” having an impairment that substantially limits one or more of a person’s major life activities; therefore, the ADA makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against employees who it regards as having such impairments.

In a December 10, 2012 decision Judge Patrick J. Schiltz of the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota rejected Valdez’s claims. The court first noted that in “regarded as” cases under the ADA, “An employee is not ‘regarded as’ disabled if the impairment that he is regarded as having is both ‘transitory and minor.'” The court also pointed out that federal regulations exclude “common ailments like the cold or flu” from being considered as disabilities in “regarded as” cases. The court then concluded that despite the subjective fear of swine flu, the objective medical evidence indicates that in reality, swine flu is no more severe than “seasonal flu.” Thus, the court dismissed Valdez’s case after ruling that, “Because swine flu is objectively transitory and minor, it is not a disability under the “regarded as” prong of the ADA…. Valdez therefore cannot be considered disabled within the meaning of the ADA.”

What you need to know: Discriminating against an employee because he or she is “regarded as” having a disability is as unlawful as discriminating against one who actually has a disability. Although the Valdez case emphasizes that not every feared ailment is protected by the ADA, employers must exercise extreme caution if they want to take action against an employee because of his or her actual or perceived state of health.

For more information about this article, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2013 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

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