June 30, 2011

Parades, puppies and the “Fargo” woodchipper

Posted in Attendance, Breaks, Computer Use, Confidential Information, Contracts, Employee Privacy, Fair Labor Standards Act, Hours Worked, Leaves of Absence, Leaves of Absence, Overtime, Record Keeping, Social Media in the Workplace, Telework / Telecommuting, Vacation Policies tagged , , at 8:51 am by Tom Jacobson

Last week I took a staycation.  Despite the fact that it was one of the rainiest June weeks on record for our neck of the woods, we had a great time. We watched two parades and a swim meet, spent time with our son who is home on leave from the Air Force Academy, and we played with our litter of Labrador pups .  We even took a side-trip to Fargo to see the wood chipper from the movie, Fargo.  And, except for my first day off when I needed to put out a fire that started the day before, I managed to not check my work e-mail or voice mail for a week.

But what if I had checked my e-mail or voice mail?  What if I had texted my secretary or my clients?  What if I had decided to post this commentary from home during one of those downpours?  Telecommuting, or “telework,” would have allowed me to turn my staycation into a working vacation.

Telecommuting offers tremendous benefits.  It allows for flexible work arrangements.  It can save on fuel and other transportation costs.  It can keep employees productive when circumstances would otherwise prevent them from working.

But telecommuting can also be a trap for the unwary.  Aside from the fact that it can distract us from our R&R, working remotely raises a number of employer-employee issues, such as:

* How are working hours tracked for an employee who works remotely?

* Is the telecommuting employee getting the break time to which s/he may be legally entitled?

* Is the employee entitled to overtime when the hours worked remotely are added to his/her workweek?

* Is an employee really on “leave” if s/he is working remotely while supposedly taking time off?

* Is the employee entitled to any tax deductions for a “home office”?

* To what extent is an employee entitled to worker’s compensation benefits if s/he is injured while working from home, and does this give the employer the right to inspect the employee’s home for safety concerns?

* How secure is the employer’s data if an employee is accessing it from or storing it on his/her home computer?

* What privacy rights, if any, does an employee have with respect to his/her cell phone, computer, etc. that is used to work remotely?

* Which jobs work best for telecommuting arrangements?

* What is lost (or in come cases, gained) when telecommuting co-workers do not have face-to-face contact?

* How can the employer be assured that the teleworking employee is actually working?

To avoid falling into a telecommuting trap, employers need to understand the risks, as well as the rewards, of remote working arrangements.  Then, by developing telecommuting agreements and policies,  employers can take full advantage of the benefits that telecommuting can offer.  For more information about the development and use of such policies and agreements, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2011 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson, PA

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June 14, 2011

Child pornography on workplace computers — ND employees become mandatory reporters

Posted in Computer Use, Cyber Bullying, Employee Handbooks, Employee Privacy, First Amendment, Social Media in the Workplace, Social Networking, Telework / Telecommuting tagged , , , , , , at 7:59 am by Tom Jacobson

In an effort to stem the troubling tide of child pornography, North Dakota has taken a unique approach: the state has passed a law requiring that all workers who know or suspect that child pornography is on a workplace computer must report the information to the North Dakota Department of Human Services.

The new law, which goes into effect on August 1, 2011 adds the following provision to section 50-25.1-03 of the state’s Child Abuse and Neglect Law:  “A person who has knowledge of or reasonable cause to suspect that a child is abused or neglected, based on images of sexual conduct by a child discovered on a workplace computer, shall report the circumstances to the department.” Under this law, it will be a crime for an employee/mandatory reporter to willfully fail to make the required report.  It will also be a crime for an employer to retaliate against an employee who makes a good faith report.

Minnesota also has a mandatory reporting law, Minnesota Statute § 626.556, but it does not impose a reporting obligation on workers in general; only certain professionals such as doctors, social workers, law enforcement personnel, clergy, etc., are designated as mandatory reporters of child abuse or neglect.  And, it does not directly address this issue of computerized child pornography.

North Dakota’s new law is not only an aggressive move to try to stop child pornography, for it is also a regulatory foray into the intertwining world of work, technology, social media, and privacy rights.   Arguably, this law gives North Dakota employers a stronger case that their employees should not expect any right of privacy with respect to their use of company computers.  It should also be signal to everyone that new laws will likely be passed to address the complex entanglement of work, social media and related technologies.

Until these laws are on the books, or until existing laws are interpreted and applied to these ever-changing technologies, the best practice is to develop sound employment policies that clarify what every employee’s rights and responsibilities are with respect to their use of social media, computers, smart phones and whatever the next great technologies may be.

For more information about this article, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2011 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson, PA

June 1, 2011

Seagate III – the saga continues

Posted in Attorney's Fees, Fraud and Misrepresentation, Hiring and Recruiting, Minnesota Statute 181.64, Minnesota Statute 181.65 tagged , at 6:41 pm by Tom Jacobson

Chandramouli Vaidyanathan’s lawsuit against Seagate Technologies continues to wind its way through the court system – at even greater cost to Seagate.  First, a jury awarded Vaidyanathan nearly $2 million after they determined that Seagate had misled him about the job they hired him to do (see  Bloomington-based Seagate Hit with $1.9m Verdict for Misrepresenting Job to Recruit).

After the jury’s award, both sides brought various post-trial motions.  The presiding judge, the Hon. Donovan Frank, upheld the jury’s verdict, and he awarded Vaidyanathan another $517,352.50 for attorney’s fees and court costs (see Seagate’s Liability to Duped Recruit Jumps to $2.4 Million).

After that award, Vaidyanathan brought another motion seeking an additional $97,655.00 in attorney’s fees incurred after the judgment was entered and through the previous post trial motions.  Judge Frank has now granted Vaidyanathan’s request, but he reduced the fee award to $63,733.75 after finding that the fees sought were “excessive in light of the tasks accomplished.”

Stay tuned.  Seagate IV may just be an appeal waiting to be filed.

For more information about this article, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2011 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson, PA

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