July 22, 2014

President issues order to protect LGBT workers

Posted in Discrimination, Gender / Sex, LGBT, Minnesota Human Rights Act, Sexual Orientation tagged , , at 2:08 pm by Tom Jacobson

White HousePresident Barack Obama on July 21, 2014 issued an executive order intended to protect the employment rights of LGBT employees of federal contractors.

Although some states, including Minnesota, already prohibit employment discrimination based on sexual orientation, not all do.  Therefore, President Obama said during the signing ceremony that he issued the order as a way “to address this injustice for every American.”

Unlike some legislation, such as the proposed Employment Non-Discrimination Act (“ENDA”) which was passed in 2013 by the U.S. Senate but which has since stalled in Congress, this executive order does not contain any exemptions based on religious beliefs.

The President also directed the U.S. Department of Labor to prepare regulations to implement the order. It is anticipated that advocates on all sides of the issue will offer significant input as the regulations are developed.

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

July 1, 2014

Key provisions of WESA take effect July 1

Posted in Care of Relatives Leave, Discrimination, Domestic violence, Employee Handbooks, Employee Privacy, Equal Pay, Gender / Sex, Leaves of Absence, Minnesota Human Rights Act, Minnesota Parenting Leave Act, Nursing Mothers, Parenting Leave, Pregnancy, Retaliation, Sick Leave, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave, Wage non-disclosure, Women's Economic Security Act tagged , , , , , at 12:56 pm by Tom Jacobson

2014_05_11_WESA_signingAlthough Gov. Mark Dayton signed it into law on May 11, 2014 the following key provisions of the Women’s Economic Security Act (WESA) go into effect today:

  • Expansion of Minnesota’s parenting and pregnancy leave laws: More employees are now eligible for this leave, and the amount of available leave has been increased from six to twelve weeks. Applies to Minnesota employers with 21 or more employees.
  • Expansion of permissible use of sick leave: Parents-in-law and grandchildren are now included in the list of persons for whom eligible employees may use their sick leave. Employees may also use sick leave for “safety leave,” which is leave for the purpose of providing or receiving assistance because of sexual assault, domestic abuse, or stalking. Applies to Minnesota employers with 21 or more employees.
  • Wage disclosure prohibitions; employee handbook notice requirement; remedies: Prohibits employers from, among other things, requiring employees to keep their wages confidential. Requires employers to include in their employee handbooks a notice regarding employees’ rights and remedies under the new law. Allows employers to prohibit wage disclosure to competitors and to otherwise protect trade secrets, proprietary and other privileged information. Applies to all Minnesota employers with one or more employees.
  • Clarifies rights of nursing mothers: Clarifies that when making reasonable efforts to provide a room or other location for expressing breast milk in privacy, that space must: be in close proximity to the work area; be somewhere other than a bathroom or a toilet stall; be shielded from view; be free from intrusion from coworkers and the public; and include access to an electrical outlet.  Applies to all Minnesota employers with one or more employees.

This is only a summary of portions of WESA that take effect today. Other provisions of WESA went into effect on May 12, 2014; more will take effect August 1, 2014. To learn how WESA may impact your workplace, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

June 26, 2014

Supreme Court invalidates President’s NLRB recess appointments

Posted in Collective Bargaining, National Labor Relations Act, Posting Requrements, Protected Concerted Activity, Social Media, Uncategorized tagged , , , , , at 1:52 pm by Tom Jacobson

In a 9-0 decision, the United States Supreme Court today struck down as unconstitutional President Barack Obama’s January, 2012 recess appointments to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). The decision calls into question the validity of hundreds of decisions made by the NLRB from January, 2012 to August, 2013.

The case, National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning, involved the NLRB’s determination that Noel Canning had committed unfair labor practices under the National Labor Relations Act. Noel Canning challenged the NLRB’s authority to make such a determination on the basis that the board itself was improperly constituted at the time of its decision.  Specifically, Noel Canning argued that President Obama’s three appointments to the board in January, 2012 were unconstitutional because he made them without the advice and consent of the Senate. The Supreme Court sided with Noel Canning.

The fallout from the high court’s decision is uncertain, but it could mean that hundreds of decisions made by the NLRB while the board was unconstitutionally composed will be invalidated.

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

May 12, 2014

Seminar to address Women’s Economic Security Act

Posted in Care of Relatives Leave, Discrimination, Domestic violence, Equal Pay, Family and Medical Leave Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Family Leave, Gender / Sex, Leaves of Absence, Leaves of Absence, Minnesota Parenting Leave Act, Nursing Mothers, Parenting Leave, Pregnancy, Reasonable Accommodation, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave tagged , , , at 8:40 am by Tom Jacobson

Gov. Mark Dayton yesterday signed into law the Women’s Economic Security Act. Among other things, the new law will expand leave rights for many Minnesota employees. The new law will be covered in detail at the Eleventh Annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update to be held on Thursday, June 12, 2014 at Alexandria Technical and Community College.

The event has been approved for 6.0 HRCI credits. For complete details on the seminar, go to 2014 Employment Law Update Agenda. To register, go to 2014 Employment Law Update Registration.

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

May 9, 2014

Legislative update: MHRA jury trials and Women’s Economic Security Act advance

Posted in Care of Relatives Leave, Court Trial, Discrimination, Domestic violence, Family and Medical Leave Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Family Leave, Jury Trial, Leaves of Absence, Nursing Mothers, Parenting Leave, Remedies, Sick Leave, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave tagged , , , , , , , , , , at 9:26 am by Tom Jacobson

Both houses of the Minnesota Legislature on May 8, 2014 took action to advance legislation which, if signed into law by Gov. Mark Dayton, will have significant impacts on Minnesota employers and employees.

First, with a 43-24 vote the Senate approved the Women’s Economic Security Act (HF2536) which, among other things, would expand parenting and sick leave rights. For more information on this bill, see Women’s Economic Security Act Passed by MN House.

Then, with a 79-51 vote the House approved the Senate’s amendment to the Minnesota Human Rights Act (MHRA) (SF 2322). This amendment would add the right to a jury trial as a remedy under the MHRA. For more information on this bill, see Minnesota Senate Adds Jury Trial Right to Minnesota Human Rights Act.

For more information about this legislation, please contact me at taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

May 6, 2014

MN Senate adds jury trial right to Human Rights Act

Posted in Court Trial, Discrimination, Jury Trial, Remedies tagged , , , , , , at 9:14 am by Tom Jacobson

SF 2322By changing a single sentence in the Minnesota Human Rights Act (MHRA), the Minnesota Senate on May 1, 2014 passed a bill which, if it becomes law, will significantly change the way MHRA disputes are decided in the courtroom.

Currently, the law (Minn. Stat. § 362A.33, subd. 6) provides that, “Any action brought pursuant to this chapter shall be heard and determined by a judge sitting without a jury.” However, the Senate’s version (SF 2322), which passed on a 55-0 vote, would change that sentence to read, “A person bringing a civil action seeking redress for an unfair discriminatory practice or a respondent is entitled to a jury trial.”

The change would be significant, for it would drastically change the way MDHR cases — such as claims for employment discrimination — would be litigated. Generally speaking, jury trials are far more expensive and complicated than are cases tried to a judge alone. A jury of six people can also be far more difficult to predict than a single judge. The change would, however, make state law consistent with its federal counterpart (Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964), which already allows for jury trials.

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

April 30, 2014

Registration Open for 11th Annual Employment Law Update

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Application Process, Arrest records, Background Checking, Conviction Records, Credit Checks, Criminal History, Discrimination, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Interactive Process, Minnesota Human Rights Act, Reasonable Accommodation, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Stereotyping, Training tagged , , , , , , , at 11:38 am by Tom Jacobson

Registration is now open for the Eleventh Annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update to be held on Thursday, June 12, 2014 at Alexandria Technical and Community College. This year’s event will cover:

  • Hot off the Press — Employment Law News You Can Use: presented by yours truly
  • Reasonable Accommodation and Fitness for Duty: A Practical Guidance on Real Work Problems: presented by attorney Penelope J. Phillips
  • Emerging Discrimination Issues in Employment Law: presented by attorney Mike Moberg
  • Ban the Box and Criminal Background Checks: Putting it All Together So That You Get it Right: presented by attorney Penelope J. Phillips
  • Bonus HR Session: Recruit, Motivate and Retain Your Workforce: presented by humorist and corporate trainer, Ted Schick

The event has been approved for 6.0 HRCI credits. Go to 2014 Employment Law Update Agenda for complete details and to 2014 Employment Law Update Registration to register. I look forward to seeing you on June 12!

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

April 24, 2014

Women’s Economic Security Act Passed by MN House

Posted in Care of Relatives Leave, Caregiver Leave, Discrimination, Domestic violence, Employee Handbooks, Equal Pay, Family and Medical Leave Act, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Gender / Sex, Leaves of Absence, Leaves of Absence, Minnesota Parenting Leave Act, Nursing Mothers, Pregnancy, Reasonable Accommodation, Workplace Violence tagged , , , , , , , , , at 11:32 am by Tom Jacobson

The Minnesota House of Representatives on April 9, 2014 passed the Women’s Economic Security Act (HF 2536) by a 106-24 vote. The companion Senate bill (SF 2050) awaits action in the Senate.

According to the Senate’s bill summary, the law will:

  • Allow mothers to stay in the workplace by expanding family leave and providing minor, reasonable accommodations for pregnant and nursing employees;
  • Decrease the gender pay gap through the participation of women in high-wage, high-demand nontraditional work;
  • Reduce the gender pay gap through increased enforcement of equal pay laws for state contractors and by allowing employees to discuss pay inequities;
  • Address economic consequences of domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault;
  • Enhance retirement security by considering a state retirement savings plan for those without an employer-provided option
  • Expand grandparent care-giving options.

The law would also allow employers to reduce the period of leave it may require by the amount of any paid leave or leave required by the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), so that the total time off does not exceed 12 weeks. The new law would clarify that only 12 weeks of leave are required even if the employee is eligible for both state and federal leave.

What you need to know: If enacted into law, this legislation will require most Minnesota employers to take a close look at their existing policies and procedures and to make any changes necessary to bring them into compliance.

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

March 26, 2014

Save the date!

Posted in Americans with Disabilities Act, Application Process, Arrest records, Background Checking, Conviction Records, Criminal History, Disability, Discrimination, Family and Medical Leave Act, Interactive Process, Leaves of Absence, Reasonable Accommodation, Sexual Orientation, Sick Leave, Sick or Injured Child Care Leave, Training, Unexcused Absence tagged , , , at 5:18 pm by Tom Jacobson

The eleventh annual West Central Minnesota Employment Law Update will be held Thursday, June 12, 2014 at Alexandria Technical and Community College. The morning session of the event is designed to inform employers about developing areas of employment law, and it will be presented by four attorneys who practice extensively in that area of the law: Tom Jacobson, Mike Moberg and Penelope Phillips.

The afternoon session will feature Ted Schick, who will educate and entertain with his presentation, “Recruit, Motivate and Retain Your Workforce.”

Comments from last year’s event:

  • “I attend yearly and look forward to it! Thanks!”
  • “I go to several conferences/seminars every year & this is the most informative of all.  Plus, the group is open & friendly — very nice! Thank you!”
  • “Overall — great day & worth the time!”
  • “Excellent program for the price.”

We hope you can join us on June 12! Stay tuned for registration, agenda and other details.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

February 27, 2014

Getting the Story Straight

Posted in Disability, Discipline, Discrimination, Legitimate business reason, Legitimate Business Reason for Termination or other Adverse Action, Pretext, Retaliation, Uncategorized tagged , , , , at 3:49 pm by Tom Jacobson

crossed fingersAs much as everyone hopes that an employee will always be the right fit for a job, sometimes employers need to discharge a worker. And unless doing so breaks a contract or is based on some unlawful reason (such as illegal discrimination), the dismissal will usually withstand any legal challenge.

One of biggest mistakes an employer can make, though, is giving inconsistent reasons for dismissing the employee. This is because inconsistent reasoning hurts the employer’s credibility and can lead a court to find that the stated reason was really a pretext to cover up unlawful discrimination.

For example, in one recent case (Barnhart v. Regions Hospital) where a former employee claimed her firing resulted from unlawful discrimination, the employer claimed the real reason was her poor attendance and her failure to call in when she was going to be late or absent. However, other evidence suggested that the employer terminated her because of company restructuring. The judge ruled that this inconsistency called into question the true reason for the employee’ termination, and he ordered that the case would need to go trial where the true reason for the dismissal would have to be decided by a court. Had the employer given a consistent explanation, the case likely would have been dismissed.

For more information about this article, please contact me at alexandriamnlaw.com or  taj@alexandriamnlaw.com.

The comments posted in this blog are for general informational purposes only. They are not to be considered as legal advice, and they do not establish an attorney-client relationship. For legal advice regarding your specific situation, please consult your attorney.

Copyright 2014 Swenson Lervick Syverson Trosvig Jacobson Schultz, PA

Next page

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 364 other followers

%d bloggers like this: